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General, Music Business

Where to send music demos

So you’re there, that magical moment, you’ve finished a track and it actually feels like it’s finished, (well if you’re like me a track never feels finished). Anyways I digress, what I’ve found out the hard way is that making music and finishing tracks is actually the easy part. The harder part for many musicians and producers is getting their music out into the world through the correct channels, where it gets the exposure it deserves.

Unsurprisingly it’s quite confusing what you should be doing with so many blogs, labels and streaming platforms out there now. It’s so easy to waste hours on futile efforts that don’t really lead anywhere. So the purpose of this weeks blog post is to hopefully point you towards some channels that can get your tracks the exposure they deserve. Before I dive in I would suggest one bit of admin that will save you a headache down the line. Set up a spreadsheet, at a minimum have a column with the track name, another column with the person / channel / blog that you’ve sent your track too and another column with any response or action they’ve taken. It’s very easy to lose track of what you’ve sent out and to whom. Finally remember to keep any communication with any entity you reach out to well written (no mistakes) and to the point (no waffle).

  • Blogs

Blogs are a brilliant place for discovering new artists. Getting your tracks onto a decent  blog can get you significant traction. Listed below are a few good ones to ignite your search:

Soundplate

YourEDM

Dancing Astronaut

Ear Milk 

So how do you get onto these blogs? Most have some kind of demo upload method where you can post a streaming link to your track, your artist details etc. However from personal experience I wouldn’t solely rely on this method. Here’s where some ingenuity on your part comes in, actually dig into the blog and articles / posts thoroughly. Usually there is an author associated with the content. Find their social media pages, contact them, build rapport and try to get them into your music too. Don’t be pushy, instead seek feedback, use your imagination and build a connection, remember neediness is never attractive! 

  • Spotify Playlists

The biggest playlists on Spotify all have demo submission forms through which to submit your music. However don’t get greedy here with the allure of success ad and trying in vain to get your music onto the biggest Spotify playlist possible. There’s many great smaller Spotify playlists out there that are easier to get your music onto. It’s extremely difficult to get your music onto a big Spotify Playlist as an unknown producer, singer or songwriter. I’d suggest trying to get onto a smaller playlist first and working your way up the Spotify playlist ladder hierarchy. If your track is good enough and people are listening to it in decent numbers there is no reason why your track won’t get onto bigger playlists. Some Spotify playlists for your consideration are:

Indiemono

Soundplate

Daily Playlists

Artist Intelligence Agency

  • Labels

There are a ton of amazing labels out there. Like playlists the bigger ones are very hard to get onto, i’m talking about labels like Spinnin, Defected, Monstercat etc. These big labels operate very professionally as business enterprises. As such, not only do you have to have amazing music, but they are usually also looking for a big fan base – it helps them sell more records / get more streams and generate more hype with less effort. 

So it’s better to initially think about getting your music onto smaller independent labels. You’ve got a much better chance of getting your track signed, you’ll hopefully get exposure by a hungry team and you will also learn the ins and outs of signing a record.

There’s a few ways to contact these labels, some are:

Find their general submission email

A submission form on their website

Contact an A + R at the label (do some digging around their site, find names etc. and reach out as necessary!)

Don’t worry if you don’t get a response, these labels get hundreds of tracks sent to them everyday. There’s a million and one reasons why you didn’t get a response, even though your head might well be telling you that the music you make and submitted is crap. Don’t listen to your head in such a scenario and keep sending your music out there. 

  • YouTube channels

YouTube channels have the same power and reach as Spotify playlists in our current era, as such they are really important when it comes to reaching (potentially) millions of fans. 

Just check out the numbers on these famous YouTube channels:

    • NCS (13M subscribers)

If you go to the ‘About’ page you can normally find details of the channel and contact details. Otherwise work back and try to find an associated website or social media account linked and dig to get a contact. There is an excellent Google Chrome extension called Hunter that lets you find email addresses associated with a web page. Check it out below and happy hunting with that one! 

Hunter

Finally

All of these things come down to how hard you hustle. Obviously you need good music first and foremost. There are some who get lucky, those anomalies that get discovered as barely pubescent teens uploading their first track randomly onto Soundcloud and it getting discovered and going viral. I have to point out this is kind of like winning the lottery, most artists who ‘make’ it have to have a strategy to get their music into the hands of the right people and have had to push and take knock backs multiple times. You really need to develop a thick skin in this industry and take rejection as just a part of the process and nothing personal. In the end I hope you get the success you seek, keep on pushing and go get what you deserve!

About Pal

Co-founder @ SendMusic // [email protected]

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